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Messages - Mot

Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1
Community bulletin board / Re: Finished competition games!
« on: April 27, 2022, 05:48:31 PM »
Hi wintermuties :)

By any chance, any of you has the source code of leucome's game The Closet (winner of the second round of the WME Competition)? The download link is no longer active.

2
I run into an issue while using SpriteEdit under Wine 7.0 (Stable). When I try to add a frame, a message pops up explaining that it needs to close the program, and subsequently it closes it down. On the other hand, the rest seems to be working fine.

So if you're set in using Wine 7.0, you can still add frames to your sprite (eg. MyFile.sprite) via a text editor, and then open the hand-edited file in SpriteEdit to set (visually) variables, such as the hotspot coordinates, etc.

To give you an idea of what you would need to do, here's a a sprite without frames (named chair.sprite) that I created by clicking the option 'Add sprite'. Then I opened it in a text editor.

Code: [Select]
; $EDITOR_PROJECT_ROOT_DIR$ ..\..\..\
; generated by SpriteEdit

SPRITE {
  NAME="chair"
  LOOPING=TRUE
  CONTINUOUS=FALSE
  PRECISE=TRUE
}

And now I will add a frame by copy-pasting the text part corresponding to the frame, like in the example below. Important: I fill the IMAGE variable with the location (within the project) where the wouldbe frame image is located; in this case: IMAGE = "tutorial\gfx\chair.bmp"

Code: [Select]
; generated by SpriteEdit

; $EDITOR_PROJECT_ROOT_DIR$ ..\..\..\

SPRITE {
  NAME="chair"
  LOOPING=FALSE
  CONTINUOUS=FALSE
  PRECISE=TRUE
  FRAME {
    DELAY = 0
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "tutorial\gfx\chair.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {0, 0}
    EDITOR_SELECTED=TRUE
  }

}

That's it. chair.sprite is ready to be opened in SpriteEdit, where I can set the hotspot coordinates of such frame, and other settings.

The same method can be applied to multiple frame sprites. Here you can see the finished version of walk.sprite portraying the character Molly walking in the dd direction:

Code: [Select]
; generated by SpriteEdit

; $EDITOR_PROJECT_ROOT_DIR$ ..\..\..\..\

SPRITE {
  NAME=""
  LOOPING=TRUE
  CONTINUOUS=FALSE
  PRECISE=TRUE
  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\00.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\01.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\02.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\03.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\04.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\05.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
    EDITOR_SELECTED=TRUE
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\06.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\07.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\08.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

  FRAME {
    DELAY = 90
    MOVE {0, 8}
    KEYFRAME=FALSE
    IMAGE = "actors\molly\dd\walk\09.bmp"
    HOTSPOT {50, 250}
  }

}

3
Quote from: Ron Gilbert
So to mix things up a little I'm taking this opportunity to announce I've decided to make another Monkey Island.

Quote from: DevolverDigital
Announcing Return to Monkey Island, the long-awaited follow-up to the legendary Secret of Monkey Island and Monkey Island 2: LeChuck's Revenge by Ron Gilbert's Terrible Toybox in collaboration with Devolver Digital and Lucasfilm Games, coming 2022.

Official website
Trailer

4
Game design / Re: Basics
« on: April 10, 2022, 09:11:17 PM »
Hi gintonik  :)

Quote
1.: I need an Actor. Is there a good (easy)tool aviable, where i can build an Actor (it have to been compatible with WME) really quickly? I tried to use Poser8 but this is a science of himself.

It seems you're talking about a 3D animated character, if so, you need a program able to export such character in the Microsoft X file format. In addition, WME would require "hidden geometry" files (in which walkable areas of scenes, 3D light positions and cameras are defined) in 3DS format. Lots and lots of 3D modeling programs support these two file formats; for example, Blender.

As for easy and quick ... I guess that's relative. You may have to spend some time learning how to design in 3D. In any case, WME Development Kit provides a 3D demo project (including a 3D character) to ease the process. If you used the default settings when you installed Wintermute, you will find it here:

C:/Program Files (x86)/WME DevKit/projects/wme_demo_3d/wme_demo_3d.wpr

You can find further information in:

1. This video tutorial series created by Jyujinkai with WME in mind:

How to Create a 3D Real-Time Character

Tutorial 01 - Creating Symmetrical Design Plates
Tutorial 02 - Modelling your Character off Design Plates
Tutorial 03 - Building Symmetrical UV Layouts
Tutorial 04 - Texturing
Tutorial 05 - Rigging: (A) Introduction, (B) Biped, (C) Skinning: Part 1 - Part 2 - Part 3

2. The Resource Center

3. The documentation:

3D characters support in WME
Principles and requirements
Actor definition file, X format
Scripting support
Additional 3D options in SceneEdit
Shadows

Quote
2.: I need Rooms. Is there a really easy tool aviable to build Rooms. Or have i use ex. Photoshop and paint a complete Room (room1.jpg)?

If you're referring to drawing the background of a scene (room), sure, a graphic design program. If you're referring to designing a scene (the background is just a part of it), I would direct you to the scene creation tutorial in the documentation.

Quote
3.: Have somebody a really easy tutorial(german) how i have use the WME?

I would start here.

5
Game design / The Secret of Creating Monkey Island
« on: April 07, 2022, 04:40:32 PM »
Interview with Ron Gilbert, published in The Adventurer, Issue No. 01, Fall 1990

Whatever possessed you to create a game about pirates, anyway?

I'd wanted to do a pirate game for a long time.

You see, one of my favorite rides in Disneyland is Pirates of the Caribbean. You get on a little boat and it takes you through a pirate adventure, climaxing in a cannon fight between two pirate ships. Your boat keeps you moving through the adventure, but I've always wished I could get off and wander around, learn more about the characters, and find a way onto those pirate ships.

So with The Secret of Monkey Island I wanted to create a game that had the same flavor, but where you could step off the boat and enter that whole storybook world. The pirates of Monkey Island aren't like real pirates, who were slimy and vicious. These are swashbuckling, fun-loving pirates, like the ones in the adventure stories everyone grows up with.

Once you had the idea, where did you go from there?

I started designing Monkey Island about two and a half years ago. But I was only about a fourth of the way through the design when Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade came up. That had to be done quickly, so we had to put Monkey Island on hold for a while. That's why it took so long to complete.

The first thing I do when I'm designing a game is sit down and write a short story. I wrote a lot of four- or five-page stories, lots of different plots.

Then I'd read each story and ask myself, is that interesting? Does that make sense? And I'd say, "well, no." So I'd throw it out and write another.

I kept writing these stories and showing them to people around the office, until I hit upon something that was really intriguing. I had put some ghosts into one of the stories, and that seemed to catch everyone's interest.

I'm not sure why there's such a close connection between pirates and ghosts, and so many stories about ghost ships and ghost pirates. In all the reading I did, I never found out where all that began. Still when I put in the ghost pirate LeChuck, that's when everything started to come together for me. Because now I had a good, strong antagonist.

You mention doing some reading. Why?

I read a lot of novels and reference books, more for the flavor of the period than for accuracy. This isn't a historically accurate game. In fact, you'll see when you play that there are a lot of anachronisms, like the vending machine at Stan's used ship yard. They're there to add humor to the game, of course, but they also have a secret, deeper relevance to the story - but I'm keeping that secret for the sequel.

A sequel? Really?

Yeah, but don't tell anyone yet.

Okay, I'll just edit that line out of the interview before it's printed. So you've got your story, and your ghost pirate. Then what?

The next step was to take the story and break it up into a step-by-step outline of what the player has to do.

You have to pick up some things, you have to get a ship, you have to find Monkey Island, and so on. I ended up with a four-page list of forty or fifty key points.

Then I started writing puzzles around each of those points. Each point might have as many as three or four puzzles that needed to be solved.

At the same time, I looked for ways to make the story nonlinear, to give players a choice of which puzzle to solve next. If you have a lot of bottlenecks, you're going to increase the chance that players will become frustrated with your game. Because they're sitting in one room trying to get through one door, and there's nothing else to do in the game until they get through that door. If you can give them other things they can do while they're trying to get through the door, they can put that puzzle aside for a while and do other stuff. Maybe they'll even see something along the way that'll help them figure out the puzzle.

Can you give us an example of this from the game?

One of the things I did to make the story less linear was to add the three trials at the start of the game. You have to prove yourself as a pirate by completing these three tests, and you can do them in any order that you want. That was done on purpose, so that you don't have to finish trial one before you can try trial two. I think it's a good design technique to, have things as nolinear as possible, but it does make the storytelling ten times as hard.

The game went through a lot of changes in the design process. The three trials are one example; I added them late in the design stage. Another change was that I decided to introduce a lot of characters in a way that wasn't directly related to the main plot. These are the people you'll eventually need for your ship's crew. But I wanted you to meet them as incidental characters while you're completing the trials. They aren't important at that point. Then when you're presented with the problem of finding a crew, you think, wow, I've already met these people, and now you can go back and really interact with them.

When you've finished the design, you're ready to start programming, right?

Wrong. After the design is finished, then comes the horrible task of budgeting and scheduling, which is no fun whatsoever. You plan out when each room is going to get drawn, when each character is going to get programmed, how much is it going to cost. This can last a couple of weeks.

A computer game used to be done by one person working for maybe a year, and it would cost thirty or forty thousand dollars. Now we're doing these huge games that teams of specialists work on together, and they're starting to cost huge amounts of money. Within a few years it'll cost a million dollars to put together a game. When you're dealing with that much money you have to plan out every detail.

Our team for Monkey Island included programmers Tim Schafer and Dave Grossman. They not only did the programming but they wrote about two-thirds of the dialog in the game, too. And Steve Purcell and Mark Ferrari did the great artwork.

Once the budgets and schedules are done, you can begin programming at last. But Monkey Island is an enourmous complex game. Where do you start?

Our first goal was to get a crude version of the game together as fast as we could. That means a lot of the animation was missing, the rooms were just sketched in, the puzzles were wired in as quickly as possible.

It took about three months to get a primitive version of Monkey Island that was playable from beginning to end. It was like having a rough cut of a movie. We could identify a lot of weak spots - we cut out a whole bunch of the game at that point because it just didn't flow well, and we added stuff where the game wasn't interesting enough.

For example?

Before you can recruit one character named Meathook, he demands you prove your bravery. You had to accomplish three things. But it slowed down the flow of the game too much, so we cut out two of them. For our story, one was enough.

We added some things, too. We realized that once you got to Monkey Island, the game became kind of slow. The reason was simply that there weren't a lot of people ... to be a deserted island. So we added a shipwrecked character on the island, and that gives you somebody to talk with. And as you piece together the story of what's been happening on Monkey Island, you discover that's he's a very important part of that story.

So that crude first version of the game actually saved us time. If instead we'd worked each part up to perfection as we went along, we'd have wasted a lot of time on things like that that would eventually be thrown out, and it would have taken twice as long to produce the game.

But Monkey Island is on the shelves at last.

I'm glad it's done. It's been two and a half years and a lot of hard work, but a lot of fun, too. We hope everyone has a great time playing it.

6
Quote from: Mnemonic
Packages are special files containing game resources in a compressed form (similar to zip archives). Once you compile your game, you can choose to store all the resources in one or more packages. Why to have multiple packages? There are many reasons ...

Click here to learn more about it
Click here to learn about everything Wintermute

7
Foro técnico / Re: Que son los packages o pack, como descargo o creo uno?.
« on: December 09, 2021, 06:05:47 PM »
Hola niccx :)

Un package (o paquete) es un archivo comprimido que contiene varios o todos los recursos del juego (imágenes, sonido, etc.). Cuando hayas terminado de crear tu juego y te propongas distribuirlo, al compilarlo, se crearán tantos archivos paquete como hayas elegido en un inicio.

Podría ser útil crear más de un paquete, por ejemplo, si creas un juego en varios idiomas y das la opción a los jugadores de descargarse específicamente el audio del idioma en el que estén interesados (y no todos). Al crear un paquete para cada idioma, puedes reducir el tamaño de lo que se vayan a descargar.

Al inicio de esta historia ...

Tras crear un nuevo proyecto en ProjectMan, hay un solo paquete llamado "data". Para crear un nuevo paquete (además de data), click derecho en algún espacio en blanco dentro del panel árbol del proyecto. Del menú que aparece selecciona "Create folder".



Esto creará una nueva carpeta al mismo nivel que "data". Click derecho sobre esta nueva carpeta y selecciona "Promote to package". A partir de este momento, esta carpeta funcionará como un nuevo paquete.



Este nuevo paquete puede contener subcarpetas, archivos, etc. Tras compilar el juego, verás dos archivos paquete, el paquete básico "data", y el nuevo.

Si seleccionas un paquete en el árbol del proyecto, puedes ajustar sus propiedades en el panel propiedades, incluyendo el orden de prioridad.



Por si ayuda ...

Jose tradujo al español gran parte de la documentación y el libro de WME. Y aquí encontrarás la versión traducida de la wiki.

8
Recently I installed Wintermute Engine Development Kit in my GNU/Linux machine (by means of Wine 5.0) and I was nicely surprised to see that everything worked: every tool and every demo (including those with 3D features).

I also tested several games made with WME (The White Chamber, Kulivočko, and James Peris) and they all worked nicely - no apparent lag, loss of graphic quality or bug.

As far as I read, these are the operating systems for which Wine provides binary packages: Android, Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, macOS, Suse, Slackware and FreeBSD. It can also be built from source.

Notes (after installing Wine):

(1) Wine comes with its own variant of DirectX, so there's no need to install native DirectX (in fact, they recommend not to). I didn't.

(2) I installed .NET Framework 2.0 (as suggested by Wintermute installer). Apparently Wine also comes with its own version (of .NET), but since Wintermute is working this way ...

(3) Wine does not sandbox malware. If you use Wine, you should be careful about which Windows programs you pick (in order to avoid installing malware). Never run Wine as root (not even sudo). Never. There's no need for it under any circumstance.



Wine (originally an acronym for "Wine Is Not an Emulator") is a compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on several POSIX-compliant operating systems, such as GNU/Linux, macOS, and BSD.

Instead of simulating internal Windows logic like a virtual machine or emulator, Wine translates Windows API calls into POSIX calls on-the-fly, eliminating the performance and memory penalties of other methods, and allowing to integrate Windows applications into the desktop.

9
Hey Cliff :)

It's great you found an answer to this puzzle !!

Half way down this page, you'll find more information relevant to this situation.

Quote from: metamorphium
there are two ways, how to approach inventory – Global (one inventory for the whole game) and Actor based – each actor has their own inventory

10
Game announcements / Re: Chaos Realm
« on: October 08, 2020, 02:00:31 PM »
Heeey Chaos

Nice to see it :D

11
Scripts, plugins, utilities, goodies / Re: Sunny Demo
« on: August 08, 2020, 06:51:57 AM »
Use monkey-wrench with links



Ta-da !! They work again :D

Link to the compiled exe: http://master.math.upatras.gr/~odnorf/mccoy/sunnyDemo.exe

Link to the sources: http://master.math.upatras.gr/~odnorf/mccoy/sunnyDemoSources.exe

12
Community bulletin board / Re: Tutorials and Capabilities
« on: April 19, 2020, 05:02:00 PM »
Hey pumkinswift  :)

Yep, in my opinion, one could use wme to do that style of game. In any case, as you're better acquainted with what you're looking for, I recommend you check some of the games that have been developed using wme.

Here's the Game Announcements section of Wintermute Engine's forum.

Here's the list of games listed in Wintermute Engine Resource Center.

As for learning resources, you have:

(1) WME documentation

(2) WME's book

(3) WME Resource Center

(4) Along with this very forum (which is a source of knowledge conveyed by lots and lots of developers over the years)

13
Heeey Francisco

It sounds great. It looks amazing. Congratulations on your work !!!  :D

14
Snažíš se vytvořit instalační/distribuční soubor? Pokud ano, můžeš použít externí program. Vyjmut ze zprávy The Starving Developer's Quickstart Guide:

Quote from: Orange Brat
Inno Setup - installer..free
CreateInstall - installer..free version
NSIS - installer...free
Molebox - non extracting file packer

Tvůj Windows operační systém může mít jeden.

Poznámka: Nepoužil jsem žádné, takže nevím, co je dobré.

15
Příklad extrahovaný z demo (..\WME DevKit\projects\wme_demo\wme_demo.wpr):

(1) ..\data\scenes\room\scr\book.script

Code: WME Script
  1. on "Take"
  2. {
  3.  
  4. ...
  5.  
  6.   // hide the book entity and place "book" item into the inventory
  7.   Game.TakeItem("book");
  8.   var EntBook = Scene.GetNode("book");
  9.   EntBook.Active = false;
  10.  
  11. ...

(2) ..\data\scenes\room\scr\desk.script

Code: WME Script
  1. on "book"
  2. {
  3.  
  4. ...
  5.  
  6.   // show the book entity again and remove "book" item from the inventory
  7.   Game.DropItem("book");
  8.   var EntBook = Scene.GetNode("book");
  9.   EntBook.Active = true;
  10.  
  11. ...

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